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With our partner, The Connecticut Historical Society, WNPR News presents unique and eclectic view of life in Connecticut throughout its history. The Connecticut Historical Society is a partner in Connecticut History Online (CHO) — a digital collection of over 18,000 digital primary sources, together with associated interpretive and educational material. The CHO partner and contributing organizations represent three major communities — libraries, museums, and historical societies — who preserve and make accessible historical collections within the state of Connecticut.

Looking Back At Connecticut's History: A Conversation With Walt Woodward

New York Public Library
Historical map of the state of Connecticut

Do you know how to make an Election Cake? What about the history of the Connecticut Witch Hunters

This hour, state historian Walt Woodward joins us to talk about his new book Creating Connecticut: Critical Moments That Shaped a Great State and answer all your questions about the Nutmeg state, starting with why do we call Connecticut the Nutmeg State? 

We’ll talk about the origins of the Pequot War, Connecticut’s long history of immigration, and Walt might just give us the recipe for the Connecticut Election Cake - it only requires 10 pounds of butter! 

What questions do you have about the Connecticut State Historian?  We want to hear from you.

GUESTS:

  • Walt Woodward - State Historian of Connecticut (@waltwould)
  • John Lyman - Executive Vice President of Lyman Orchards (@LymanOrchards)

  

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Lucy leads Connecticut Public's strategies to deeply connect and build collaborations with community-focused organizations across the state.
Tess is a senior producer for Connecticut Public news-talk show Where We Live. She enjoys hiking Connecticut's many trails and little peaks, gardening and writing in her seven journals.

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